Isle of Wight Carriages

One of the things I like about the Isle of Wight Steam Railway is that you get a history of the carriage you are travelling in. It takes the form of one of the carriage posters that trains used to have (and still do on many of the preserved railways. This was in the compartment I travelled in last month.

image002We’ll zoom in in just a tick, but let’s note first that this is one of three posters along each side of the carriage and we’ll also notice the net luggage rack above. As naughty youngsters we used to love clambering up into them.

That poster, handily, divides into three parts.

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That’s quite a history for this carriage with frames that had seen World War One service in France given a 1922 body at the old LB and SCR works at Lancing. The carriage crossed the Solent to the island in 1938 and remained in service until running on the last steam hauled train on the last day of 1966. It has been based at Havenstreet on the heritage line since 1971 so it did 44 years as a ‘proper’ railway carriage and has now served 44 years in preservation.

Next to the carriage history is a Southern Railway safety notice.

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This coach was operated by the Southern Railway from 1923 until 1948.

And the third section has information about the Isle of Wight Steam Railway.

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I think the Isle of Wight Steam Railway have done a fantastic job. The train I travelled on in June 2015 could have come straight from the 1960s (or earlier). It was hauled by a loco that worked on the island in the 1960s and was composed entirely of carriages used 50 years ago as well. I know that at peak times the line can bring out its set of 4 wheeled coaches rebuilt from a very poor condition. Many of these old island coaches had ended their days as beach huts. I have featured one on this blog with a photo I took in 1969. Click here.

I’d add that the new ‘Train Story’ display, opened since my last visit in 2013, was fantastic. I might feature it at some point so I’ll say no more now.

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One Response to “Isle of Wight Carriages”

  1. sed30 Says:

    Reblogged this on sed30's Blog.

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