Guard Training

On a recent trip to the Swanage Railway (last month) we knew there would only be one passenger train operating but we were caught unawares by a freight train awaiting our passenger train at Corfe Castle station.

As we approached, I snapped a hurried photo of the loco at the head of the goods train ā€“ a steamy and atmospheric sort of photo on what was a grim day for weather.

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Later we discovered this train was out and about for guard training. We caught up with it again later in the day when we alighted at Corfe Castle

The loco is number 31806 and she is of class U ā€“ often called U-boats. The first ones were rebuilds of the ill-fated River class tanks. They had been introduced in 1917 and they became U class from 1928. 31806 had been one of those powerful tank engines.

During my train spotting days she was based at Basingstoke and never came my way although I saw 42 of the 50 engines of this class.

Anyway, in atrocious weather she pulled her assorted wagons into Corfe Castle station, there to await the arrival of the passenger train down from Norden.

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And here comes that passenger train.

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A moment later the man in the hi-viz jacket was exchanging single line working tokens with the footplate crew on the lovely M7 tank on the passenger train.image008

Meanwhile, the guards in training were waiting patiently in their 1942 built guards van.

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That really shows the rain!

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4 Responses to “Guard Training”

  1. Janet Says:

    Reblogged this on Janet’s thread.

  2. Simon - Brookes Castle Says:

    Reblogged this on Loco Yard and commented:
    Guards training in the rain.

  3. Dave Says:

    BR Freight Guards never, ever, travelled on the front verandah. An emergency brake application, particularly on a loose coupled train, could propel a guard over the verandah and underneath the train.

  4. sed30 Says:

    Reblogged this on sed30's Blog and commented:
    Thanks for the story, one of my fav lines

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