Posts Tagged ‘1845’

Frederick Crosby

September 15, 2014

Meet the Relative

Frederick Crosby was my great great uncle. I never knew him.

He was born in Tunstall in Suffolk in 1845. His parents were James Crosby and Mary Ann Cullingford Smith who were my great great grandparents. Don’t get any idea that the double barrelled surname of Mary Ann implied any kind of high status. It was quite the reverse. Her father was born out of wedlock and was officially a Smith but used the name of his dad (and mum when they married) of Cullingford.

But let’s look at Frederick. By 1851 his parents had moved down the road to Butley and we can find Fred there for both the 1851 and 1861 censuses.

Frederick then became a part of the family exodus from Suffolk and in 1871 we find him working on a farm near Tillingham in Essex. Several members of the Crosby family moved there.

But agriculture was very depressed and Frederick moved to Durham to become a miner. Here he married a girl from East Anglia called Ann Smith. I say a girl, but she was already 41 when they married in 1878. She was a widow and her maiden surname was Buck.  They had a daughter, Mary Ann Crosby who was born in 1880. She died in 1960.

In 1881 Fred, Ann with children from her first marriage and baby Mary were in Consett and Fred was a miner. The 1891 address was lovely – Delight Bank in Collierley, Durham.

Ann died in 1897. There is a memorial card.

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In 1901 we find just Fred and daughter Mary Ann in Collierley with Fred now working as a roadman.

Fred remarried in 1904 his wife was Elizabeth Skipper. She was a widow, nearly twenty years younger than Fred. She brought her children to the marriage. The following year they had a son, also Frederick Crosby.

I wonder if this photo of Fred senior dates from around that time.

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The 1911 census shows the family in Collierley.

Frederick died in 1929. Elizabeth in 1944.

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Meet the ancestor – Nicholas Lanfear

January 15, 2013

Nicholas was a great great great grandfather. He was born in the eighteenth century. We do not have photos of him.

We really do not know where he was born, but later census information tells us that the Lanfear family is largely found in Wiltshire, Berkshire, Hampshire and Gloucestershire so Nicholas was most probably born in one of these southern English counties.

Nicholas was no stranger to courts of law. In fact our earliest data comes from a court settlement examination in which he said that he was working in Crawley, Hampshire in about 1808. He also said that his parents travelled about the country looking for work.

A later court case (we’ll come to that) in 1832 gives his age as 37 so we assume he was born around 1795.

Nicholas married Mary Limbrick in 1818. The couple had five children that we know about.

Forename

Surname

Born

at

Baptised

at

Married

Descendants

Mary Ann

Lanfear

1821

Westbury on Severn

William Voice

George Lanfear

Edith

Lanfear

1823

Cheltenham

22 6 1823

Taynton

1) George Gough

2) Thomas Longman

6 known

Henry

Lanfear

1826

Cheltenham

25 1 1826

Cheltenham

Eliza Pearce

12 known

Louisa

Lanfear

1828

21 9 1828

William Riddiford

2 known

Rosina

Lanfear

1830

Thornbury

Robert Warren

In addition, Mary had two children who carried the Lanfear surname but these were not the children of Nicholas.

Forename

Surname

Born

at

Baptised

at

Married

Descendants

James

Lanfear

1834

Thornbury

23 7 1834

Thornbury (died 1836)

Charles

Lanfear

1840

16 8 1840

Sarah Robins

This brings us to the 1832 court case. Nicholas was charged with sheep stealing.

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‘Charged on oath before me on suspicion of feloniously stealing one ewe sheep of the value of forty shillings the property of Edward Doward of the parish of Alverstone yeoman’

The case notes which are in the Gloucester records library, give a description of our Nicholas.

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‘Dark brown hair light blue eyes long face sallow complexion a scar on his right arm several moles on his arms two moles and two white scars near the navel a large mole a little above his rump rather lame in his right ancle not read nor write hurdle maker’

The next bit is unclear but at a guess the 5.5¼ is his height of five feet five and a quarter inches.

Nicholas was found guilty – and the sentence?

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He was transported for life. Nicholas was to become an Australian. He left his home country on board the Jupiter on the last day of 1832. His destination was the penal colony at Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania). He was given a conditional pardon in 1845. That’s the last firm evidence we have although a Nicholas Langfield died at Albury New South Wales in 1859, with an age given as 75.

Nicholas may have been a bit of a rogue, but it is quite probable that the crime he was convicted of and which caused the breakup of his family was one of hunger.